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5-strategies-that-create-workplace-happiness

This is a guest post from Riya Sander.

Creating a happy workplace can make it easier to retain your workers, allowing you to avoid the costs related to employee turnover. It can also increase the morale of those who stay, which may lead to higher productivity and a greater likelihood that your people take ownership of their work.

If happy workers are more loyal and productive workers, then worker happiness will have a direct impact on the profitability of your business.

What are some steps that you can take to ensure that your people are happy at work?

1. Emphasize Employee Wellness in the Workplace

If you want to keep your people happy, you will need to keep them healthy. Emphasizing health and wellness in the workplace ensures that employees don’t come to work sluggish, sick or injured.

Ways that you can improve worker health include providing an on-site gym, an on-site urgent care center or allowing workers to take time out of their day for a short walk. As a general rule, a brisk walk to reduce stress is a much more healthy and effective way to keep energy levels up compared with common alternatives like a cup of coffee or energy drink to perk up in the middle of the afternoon.

2. Ask Employees for Their Input

Conducting an employee happiness survey will allow you to learn more about what your people like and what they wish they could change about their jobs. For instance, you may discover that they don’t mind working 12 hours a day so long as they have the flexibility to choose when and where they work. By asking your people for this type of input, you can craft a schedule or create other working conditions that best meet the needs of the company and those who work for it.

ask-employees-for-their-input

3. Provide Office Cleaning Services

Employees may have a hard time keeping their mind free from clutter if the office is a mess. Therefore, it may be in your company’s best interests to hire an office cleaning service that can vacuum the floors, take out the trash and get rid of dust and other irritants in the air. In addition to helping your employees get more done, they may be healthier for it in the long run.

Hiring an office cleaning service may be a good idea even if employees share a communal working space. In fact, it may be even more important if employees share one work space since you don’t want insects or rodents running around or germs being spread between people who are working in close proximity to each other.

4. Provide Financial Incentives for a Job Well Done

You should give your workers as much incentive to do a good job as possible. For those who go above and beyond what is expected of them, you might want to compensate them for their efforts. Providing workers with a bonus for doing a good job with a client or for adding a new account will show your people that their efforts are recognized and valued. You may also want to give employees stock options or an equity stake in the company if it makes sense to do so.

5. Give Your Employees a Chance to Step Up

Employees generally don’t want to feel stuck in the same position for their entire careers. If an employee doesn’t think that they have a chance to make the most of their talents with your organization, they may look elsewhere. This is generally true even if the person enjoys working for your business. Therefore, it may be worth implementing a training program to help workers develop their skills and communicate their desire to expand their role. This will allow you to identify your potential future leaders, which will make it easier to promote from within and to replace your top managers when they eventually leave.

Your employees deserve to have a rewarding and fulfilling work experience. If you can provide them with the right incentives and encouragement, then your business will find it easier to attract and retain a large pool of talented, loyal and productive employees. This is just what you need to keep your business thriving for years to come.

Riya Sander is a reader and Australia-based writer. As a freelancer, Riya understands the importance of productivity at work. She never stops finding new ways to increase her productivity. Follow her on Twitter.

(Image Source: Pexels 1 and Pexels 2)


frankurt-europes-new-fintech-hub-2

This is a guest post from Marguerite Arnold.

Frankfurt is one of the oldest business centres in the world. From at least Roman times, the low-lying city, bifurcated by the welcoming River Main, has been a hotspot for global endeavours that changed the nature of many industries – including but not limited to banking. Mayer Rothschild, a courtier to the German king of Hessen at the time, used the famous freedoms of the city to launch a global banking empire in the 1760’s.

frankurt-europes-new-fintech-hub

These days, Frankfurt is not just Europe’s banking centre and home to the European Central Bank. It is also on the verge of leading another revolution – in Fintech.

Why?

The first is just geography. In no other city where Fintech has taken hold are the presence of financial types and large banks so concentrated in such a small place. Frankfurt is roughly the size of Charlotte, North Carolina (the second largest banking centre in the U.S.) However, its residents, few in number compared to other large and influential cities and banking hubs, are both highly international (40% of the city is from somewhere else) and highly financially literate.

Further, with Fintech taking hold as a revolutionary force in banking and insurance, the large banks here are considering how to transition in a digital world which will change their business operations and market footprint – and that is not limited just to corporate banks, but global powerhouses like the ECB itself.

Frankfurt is an increasingly dynamic hub of Fintech start-ups, with unparalleled access to large banks. Even in London and New York, both financial superpowers in their own right, Fintechs do not have the same ability to reach power brokers and decision makers so easily and directly.

Frankfurt is also home to a well-heeled group of investors – whether they be individual “angels” or family offices – who are looking, at this point, for the next digital growth story. That makes the city one of the best places to both live and pitch on a regular basis. The start-up scene itself here is relatively tightly knit but, critically, also open to newcomers. Most advertise meetings on the Meetup Platform. It is possible to go to (at least) one event every day of the week.

Cross promotion of different kinds of events is also beginning to happen as the scene begins to mature. While the opening of Accelerator Frankfurt marks the first of such entities, it won’t be the last. Free office space for promising start-ups is relatively easy to find.

Unlike Berlin, Frankfurt also promises to be a city that promotes the growth of more B2B financial endeavours. While there are digital entrepreneurs here with start-ups of every kind, the mix in Frankfurt promises to see an increasing slate of innovative business models challenging every part of the banking and insurance business (which in Germany are more tightly linked than almost anywhere else in the world).

The impact of Brexit is also likely to give the Fintech start up scene here a boost, although it is uncertain at this juncture how much of one and in what form. What it is likely to do, however, besides sending a flood of British expats, is create a banking industry itself that is ripe for change and innovation.

Frankfurt is also (relatively speaking) far cheaper to live and work in (certainly comparable to Berlin). There are regional trains, subways that line up with station platforms and even street trains (plus busses) that make this little gem on the Main a potential start up paradise.

Four hundred years after Rothschild revolutionized banking, therefore, on the banks of the Main, another age dawns that promises innovations that are just as earthshattering, albeit this time, digital.

Marguerite Arnold is an entrepreneur, author and third semester EMBA candidate at the Frankfurt School of Finance and Management.

(Image Source: Wikipedia)


political-correctness-killed-the-republic

Six months ago I predicted that Trump would most likely win the US election. The official opinion polls told the opposite story, that Hillary was the preferred candidate, but my reading of the situation was different.

It was mid-July, and I was attending a talk given by Elizabeth Economy, Director for Asia Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. Economy gave a wonderful speech, and she shared her view that a Trump victory would be truly unthinkable. This was the consensus in the room. However, despite her convictions, and the pro-Hillary audience, Economy couldn’t help smiling broadly every time she mentioned Trump’s name.

This was extremely telling.

It has been said that emotion makes people act, and logical makes them think. Trump is a man who clearly knows how to connect with people’s emotions, while Hillary is woman with a lot of knowledge, experience and intellect.

And so, it occurred to me that if a thoughtful intellectual type who strongly opposed Trump’s candidacy was having trouble resisting his charm, brand, charisma, call it what you will, then what hope had everybody else?

What hope indeed.

Donald Trump is now president-elect of the United States of America.

Who is to blame?

No single person or event is to blame, perhaps, but I believe a culture of political correctness in the West is one of the causes that has contributed towards America’s current predicament.

Let me share a brief anecdote.

A few days before the US election I shared with friends on Facebook my view that both candidates were bad choices for president.

On the one hand, Donald Trump, a man who hurls abuse at Mexicans, Muslims and anyone who tries to challenge him, inspires fanatical devotion in his followers and, based on everything we know about his behaviour, given the opportunity Trump will not hesitate to make a show of strength or take steps to enhance his own power. A potentially dangerous temperament.

On the other hand, Hillary Clinton, an intelligent, hard-working and ambitious career politician who has survived and thrived in a broken political system by adopting a public and private persona, and at times appears to have placed pragmatism over principle (shown by her decision to accept donations to the Clinton Foundation from Qatar and Saudi Arabia, known funders of terrorism, while she was Secretary of State).

Wonderful! Two wonderful choices!

I didn’t want Trump to win, but both candidates had clear weaknesses, and I thought I had a right to comment.

Shortly after sharing these thoughts on Facebook, I deleted the post. I was under attack from a number of my pro-Hillary friends, and so I ducked for cover.

How dare I say anything negative about Hillary!!!???

How dare I indeed.

My feeling is that the political thought police are doing America and the West a grave dis-service and causing more harm than good.

What kind of societies do we want to live in?

Ones where people have to tip-toe around and only share their true thoughts in private or at the ballot box?

Or ones where ideas and issues are openly and candidly debated and discussed?

Hopefully you will agree that openness and debate are the best option.

But don’t just take my word for it. Have a listen to the wise and amusing words of Jonathan Pie (the satirical news reporter played by Tom Walker). Foul language warning! You might not want to play this if you are in the workplace, or if you are sensitive to the F-word.

(Image Source: Odyssey)


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